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One Day Movie Essay Citation

MLA Works Cited: Periodicals

Summary:

MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook (8th ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page.

Contributors: Tony Russell, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli, Russell Keck, Joshua M. Paiz, Michelle Campbell, Rodrigo Rodríguez-Fuentes, Daniel P. Kenzie, Susan Wegener, Maryam Ghafoor, Purdue OWL Staff
Last Edited: 2018-02-14 01:34:01

Periodicals include magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals. Works cited entries for periodical sources include three main elements—the author of the article, the title of the article, and information about the magazine, newspaper, or journal. MLA uses the generic term “container” to refer to any print or digital venue (a website or print journal, for example) in which an essay or article may be included.

Use the following format for all citations:

Author. Title. Title of container (self contained if book), Other contributors (translators or editors), Version (edition), Number (vol. and/or no.), Publisher, Publisher Date, Location (pp.). 2nd container’s title, Other contributors, Version, Number, Publisher, Pub date, Location.

Article in a Magazine

Cite by listing the article's author, putting the title of the article in quotations marks, and italicizing the periodical title. Follow with the date of publication. Remember to abbreviate the month. The basic format is as follows:

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Periodical, Day Month Year, pages.

Poniewozik, James. "TV Makes a Too-Close Call." Time, 20 Nov. 2000, pp. 70-71.

Buchman, Dana. "A Special Education." Good Housekeeping, Mar. 2006, pp. 143-48.

Article in a Newspaper

Cite a newspaper article as you would a magazine article, but note the different pagination in a newspaper. If there is more than one edition available for that date (as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition after the newspaper title.

Brubaker, Bill. "New Health Center Targets County's Uninsured Patients." Washington Post, 24 May 2007, p. LZ01.

Krugman, Andrew. "Fear of Eating." New York Times, 21 May 2007, late ed., p. A1.

If the newspaper is a less well-known or local publication, include the city name in brackets after the title of the newspaper.

Behre, Robert. "Presidential Hopefuls Get Final Crack at Core of S.C. Democrats." Post and Courier [Charleston, SC],29 Apr. 2007, p. A11.

Trembacki, Paul. "Brees Hopes to Win Heisman for Team." Purdue Exponent [West Lafayette, IN], 5 Dec. 2000, p. 20.

A Review

To cite a review, include the title of the review (if available), then the phrase, “Review of” and provide the title of the work (in italics for books, plays, and films; in quotation marks for articles, poems, and short stories). Finally, provide performance and/or publication information.

Review Author. "Title of Review (if there is one)." Review of Performance Title, by Author/Director/Artist. Title of Periodical, Day Month Year, page.

Seitz, Matt Zoller. "Life in the Sprawling Suburbs, If You Can Really Call It Living." Review of Radiant City, directed by Gary Burns and Jim Brown. New York Times, 30 May 2007, p. E1.

Weiller, K. H. Review of Sport, Rhetoric, and Gender: Historical Perspectives and Media Representations, edited by Linda K. Fuller. Choice, Apr. 2007, p. 1377.

An Editorial & Letter to the Editor

Cite as you would any article in a periodical, but include the designators "Editorial" or "Letter" to identify the type of work it is.

"Of Mines and Men." Editorial. Wall Street Journal, eastern edition, 24 Oct. 2003, p. A14.

Hamer, John. Letter. American Journalism Review, Dec. 2006/Jan. 2007, p. 7.

Anonymous Articles

Cite the article title first, and finish the citation as you would any other for that kind of periodical.

"Business: Global Warming's Boom Town; Tourism in Greenland." The Economist, 26 May 2007, p. 82.

"Aging; Women Expect to Care for Aging Parents but Seldom Prepare." Women's Health Weekly, 10 May 2007, p. 18.

An Article in a Scholarly Journal

A scholarly journal can be thought of as a container, as are collections of short stories or poems, a television series, or even a website. A container can be thought of as anything that is a part of a larger body of works. In this case, cite the author and title of article as you normally would. Then, put the title of the journal in italics. Include the volume number (“vol.”) and issue number (“no.”) when possible, separated by commas. Finally, add the year and page numbers.

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal, Volume, Issue, Year, pages.

Bagchi, Alaknanda. "Conflicting Nationalisms: The Voice of the Subaltern in Mahasweta Devi's Bashai Tudu." Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, vol. 15, no. 1, 1996, pp. 41-50.

Duvall, John N. "The (Super)Marketplace of Images: Television as Unmediated Mediation in DeLillo's White Noise." Arizona Quarterly, vol.50, no. 3, 1994, pp. 127-53.

An Article in a Special Issue of a Scholarly Journal

When an article appears in a special issue of a journal, cite the name of the special issue in the entry’s title space, in italics. Add the descriptor “special issue of” and include the name of the journal, also in italics, followed by the rest of the information required for a standard scholarly journal citation.

Web entries should follow a similar format, and should include a URL, DOI, or permalink.

Burgess, Anthony. "Politics in the Novels of Graham Greene." Literature and Society, special issue of Journal of Contemporary History, vol. 2, no. 2, 1967, pp. 93-99.

Case, Sue-Ellen. “Eve's Apple, or Women's Narrative Bytes.” Technocriticism and Hypernarrative, special issue of Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 43, no. 3, 1997, pp. 631-50. Project Muse, doi:10.1353/mfs.1997.0056.

Review (Book, Film Performance)

For all reviews, include the reviewer, then the title of the review if there is one, followed by “Review of” and the name of the work being reviewed (book, play , film, opera, ballet, concert). For a review of a performance, add relevant information about the performance, for example, venue, at your discretion. Finally, include publication information of the periodical in which the review appears.

Book Review

In-Text Citation

(Bethune 65)

Works Cited

Key:

Reviewer's Last Name, First Name. "Review Title (if there is one)."

Review of Title of Book Being Reviewed,by Book Author's First and Last Name. Publication in which Review Appears, Day Month Year,URL, permalink, or doi. Accessed Day Month Year.

Example:

Bethune, Brian. "Geology Professor Salomon Kroonenberg Explains 'Why

Hell Stinks of Sulfur'." Review of Why Hell Stinks of Sulfur: Mythology and Geology of the Underworld,by Salomon Kroonenberg. Maclean's, 14 June 2014, www.macleans.ca/culture/books/why-hell-stinks-of-sulfur-mythology-and-geology-of-the-underworld/. Accessed 25 Oct. 2016.

 

Notice:

  • The reviewer's name is followed by the title of the review. If the review has no title, the author's name is simply followed by "Review of " and the title of the reviewed work in italics.

 

Film Review

In-Text Citation

(Taylor)

Iin this example there is no page number as the film review is from a newspaper accessed online.

Works Cited

Key:

Reviewer's Last Name, First Name. "Review Title." Review of Title of Film

Being Reviewed,directed by Film Director's Name, Publication in which Review Appears, Day Month Year, URL or permalink. Accessed Day Month Year.

Example:

Taylor, Kate.""Terrence Malick’s Voyage of Time a Lyrical Account of

Earth’s Evolution.” Review of Voyage of Time, directed by Terrence Malick,The Globe and Mail, 21 Oct. 2016, www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/film-reviews/terrence-malicks-voyage-of-time-a-lyrical-account-of-earths-evolution/article32459949/. Accessed 25 Oct. 2016.

 

Performance Review

In-Text Citation

(Harris)

Iin this example there is no page number as the film review is from a newspaper accessed online.

Works Cited

For a review of a performance, add relevant information about the performance, for example, venue, at your discretion.

Key:

Reviewer's Last Name, First Namet. "Review Title." Review of Title of

Performance or Name of Performer Being Reviewed, by Director/Company, Venue and Location, Publication in which Review Appears. Day Month Year, URL or permalink.Accessed Day Month Year.

Example:

Harris, Robert. "Sondra Radvanovsky Gives Blissful Performance in

COC’s Production of Norma." Review of Norma, by the Canadian Opera Company, Four Seasons Centre, Toronto, Globe and Mail, 17 Oct. 2016, www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/theatre-and-performance/sondra-radvanovsky-gives-blissful-performance-in-cocs-production-of-norma/

article32291338/.Accessed 25 Oct. 2016.

 

Notice:

  • If you use a print source, you would include a page number in place of a url or permalink.